I Yam Who I Yam

In the last few months, several of my Energy Healing Institute clients have been through radical reorganizations in their lives.  Not teensy transits, or minor kerfuffles that created a need to fluff their aura and regroup.  No sirree.  We’re talking big changes, lollapaloozers, the big enchildadas – the ones that take cohones to even contemplate!

And each one of these folks began with the idea that the change that was ensuing would shift the dynamics around them, but not necessarily catalyze internal evolution as well.

Which proved to be a fallacy.

But it’s true – I Yam Who I Yam – as long as we can all agree that Who I Yam is subject to change.  Repeatedly.  With or without notice.

The Yin and the Yam

Think about it.  If the cells in the body completely refresh themselves every seven years, why would your Yam or my Yam not refresh as well?

I clearly remember the day that I grokked that each time I cleared energy was a healing.  It shifted who I Yam and it shifted my relationship with all the other Yams in my life.  And it helped me realize that each time I took action to evolve my awareness, I grew and changed.  Becoming more of who I Yam. And that’s the point.

Sometimes people come to my practice or to EHI’s training programs looking for the magic bullet, the flashing strobe light that will create the change they’re seeking.  And while people are capable of lightning fast change, miracles are actually predicated in our conscious awareness and anything’s possible, our process doesn’t always happen that way.

But some of the insights that have been gleaned by my clients of late include:

  • The awareness that being engaged in life through head awareness doesn’t quite trump heart awareness.  Better things happen when the heart’s in the game.
  • The understanding that even if a relationship comes to an end, there are lessons and experiences that have informed and elevated perspective, setting the stage for a better fit with someone else.
  • The knowledge that trying to help others (as a friend, a healer or an employee) isn’t the point.  Helping self, taking care of the self first is paramount to be effective in being in service to others.
  • The realization that over-identification with childhood trauma and a constant need to revisit those woundings doesn’t heal them.  It’s through detachment and letting go that the trauma eases.

All of these insights seem easy to grasp – when it’s not Your Yam that has to do the grasping!  But when it’s your own Yam with the skin in the game, these insights can sometimes be hard won.

And yet, when they emerge, the Yam evolves, becoming more facile at navigating life’s challenges, more anchored in the sense of self – the quintessential Yamness of who you Yam.

So when it’s tempting to believe that you Yam who you Yam, consider the possibility that there’s an even bigger, better spud under there just waiting for you to release, clear, let go.

We’re never really required to stay stuck in our Yam.  You Yam who You Yam.  For now.  I Yam who I Yam.  For now.  But wait til you see me tomorrow.  Then I’ll be able to say I Yam who I Yam and be different.  And the beat goes on…

Keep your vital energy flowing.

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    • Thank you Jenna – I’m leaving for Hawaii this week, and I guess I got myself muddled about the difference between a kahuna and a cohones! Made me laugh out loud to get your comment! I actually knew this, just have Aloha on the brain!

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